Tetyana Shlikhar

  • Visiting Lecturer, Russian Major Undergraduate Advisor

Dr. Tetyana Shlikhar is a recent graduate of the PhD program in the Slavic Department at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include Russian language pedagogy, assessment and curriculum planning, as well as 20th- and 21st- century Russian and Ukrainian literature and cinema, memory studies, and the Russo-Ukrainian conflict. The majority of Tetyana’s current research sits at the intersection of the study of cultural memory, ideology, empire/nation relations, and trauma. Her dissertation, “Between Histories and Memories: Memory Wars in Contemporary Russian and Ukrainian Cinema,” examines the ways in which historical film is used by state authorities to construct cultural identities, wherein contemporary films generate discourses that make history a site of contestation. Dr. Shlikhar also received her first PhD in Translation studies from the Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv (Ukraine), authored numerous translations, and conducted research in the area of drama translation at the University of Binghamton, SUNY as a Fulbright scholar.

Education & Training

  • MA, Translation and Philology, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 2006
  • PhD (Kandidat nauk), Translation Studies, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 2010
  • MA, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh, 2016
  • PhD, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh, 2020

Courses Taught

Russian Fairy Tales (Fall 2020)
Masterpieces of the 19 c. Russian Literature (Fall 2020)
Early Russian culture (Fall 2020)
Elementary Russian (Spring 2020)
Elementary Russian (Fall 2019)
Modern Russian Culture (Spring 2018)
Early Russian Culture (Fall 2017)
Intermediate Russian (Spring 2017)
Intermediate Russian (Fall 2016)
Elementary Ukrainian II (Spring 2016)
Elementary Ukrainian I  (Fall 2015)

 

Representative Publications

2014: Review of the Ukrainian Film Festival: “Pittsburgh Hoverla Film Fest Showcases Ukrainian Filmmakers.” Ukrainian Weekly (Dec. 2014): 9.

2013: “Specific Nature of Drama Translation.” Proceedings of Language for International Communication Symposium: Linking of Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Riga: University of Latvia.

Book Chapter

2020: “Russia on the Margins?.” Cinemasaurus. Edited by Nancy Condee, Aleksander Prokhorov, and Elena Prokhorova. Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2020.

Film Reviews

2019: A long and Happy Life [2013]. Dir. Khlebnikov, Boris. Russian Film Symposium 2019: “Shadow Empire.” https://www.rusfilm.pitt.edu/a-long-and-happy-life/.

2018: Battle for Sebastopol [2015]. Dir. Mokritskii, Sergei. Russian Film Symposium 2018: “A Spectre is Haunting Russia. History and Cinema.” http://www.rusfilm.pitt.edu/battle-for-sevastopol/.

2017: Everybody Dies But Me [2008]. Dir. Germanika, Valeria Gai. Russian Film Symposium 2017: “White Elefant”. http://www.rusfilm.pitt.edu/everybody-dies-but-me/.

2016: Elki 2. [2011]. Dir. Kiselev, Dmitrii, Aleksandr Baranov, Aleksandr Kott, Levan Gabriadze. Russian Film Symposium 2016: “Recycle, Restage, Rewind.” http://www.rusfilm.pitt.edu/?p=1638.

2015: The Thief [1997]. Dir. Chukhrai, Pavel. Russian Film Symposium 2015: “Red Empire Reloaded.”.  https://www.rusfilm.pitt.edu/thief/.

Book Reviews

2018: Jason C. Vaughn’s A Socio-Political Model of Lies in Russia. SEEJ Vol. 62 No 3 (Fall 2018): 627-8.

2016: Jones Irwin and Helena Motoh’s. Žižek and His Contemporaries: On the Emergence of the Slovenian Lacan. SEEJ  Vol 60 (2) (Summer 2016): 376-7.

Research Interests


• Memory studies
• Empire and nation
• Ideology and identity construction
• Russo-Ukrainian conflict
• 20th and 21st century Russian literature, cinema, and culture
• Second-language acquisition
• Assessment and curriculum planning
 

Representative Conference Presentations

“Contrasting Memories of the Second World War in Russian and Ukrainian Contemporary Cinema.” Annual Convention of the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages, February 6-9, 2020

“Between Histories and Memories: Myth-Making in Contemporary Russian Historical Film.” Annual Convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Boston, December 5-9, 2018

“Imperial Ambitions and National Aspirations: Memory Wars in Contemporary Russian and Ukrainian Cinema.” Annual Conference “Establishing Independence” of the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia, Pittsburgh, March 23-25, 2018

“From Center to Periphery: a Revision of Imperial Consciousness in Soviet Ukrainian Cinema of the 1960s and the 1970s.” Annual Convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Washington DC, November 17 – 20, 2016

“Collective Memory and Identity in Contested Spaces in Ukraine: Regional Singularities.” Annual Convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Philadelphia, November 19 – 21, 2015

“Remapping of the Collective Memories and Identity in the Contested Territories of Ukraine.” Annual Conference of the Graduate Organization for the Study of Europe and Central Asia, Pittsburgh, February 20-21, 2015

“Specific Nature of Drama Translation”, Language for International Communication Symposium: Linking of Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Riga: University of Latvia, 2013